In the 1990s, India's economy liberalized and acceptance grew that India's policies will need to conform to international treaties and conventions. New Delhi has sought to achieve this by balancing its international obligations and its domestic priorities. This is reflected well in the new IPR policy, the overarching slogan being "Creative India: Innovative India". 

(From Left to Right:) Arun Venkataraman (U.S Dept. of Commerce, Intl. Trade Administration), Jeremiah Norris (Hudson Institute, Center for Science in Public Policy), Neena Shenai (Medtronic), and Leticia Santos (BSA) discussing multilateral trade pacts and Indian trade, with Ashley Mergen Moderating.

(From Left to Right:) Arun Venkataraman (U.S Dept. of Commerce, Intl. Trade Administration), Jeremiah Norris (Hudson Institute, Center for Science in Public Policy), Neena Shenai (Medtronic), and Leticia Santos (BSA) discussing multilateral trade pacts and Indian trade, with Ashley Mergen Moderating.

The Hudson Institute, in conjunction with the U.S Chamber of Commerce's Global IP Center, held a half-day conference on India's Intellectual Property Rights policy on June 30th, 2016. The conference included two panels: India in Isolation - The Growth of Multilateral Trade Pacts; and National IPR Policy - The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. The panelists discussed the prospects of an innovative environment in the wake of the new IPR policy. 

Dr. Aparna Pande moderating a discussion on India's National IPR Policy with Amiee Aloi (PhRMA), Kalpana Reddy (GIPC), and Joe Walsh (21st Century Fox). 

Dr. Aparna Pande moderating a discussion on India's National IPR Policy with Amiee Aloi (PhRMA), Kalpana Reddy (GIPC), and Joe Walsh (21st Century Fox).